Announcing the Google Cloud Platform Research Credits Program

Posted by Steven Butschi, Head of Higher Education, Google

Scientists across nearly every discipline are researching ever larger and more complex data sets, using tremendous amounts of compute power to learn, make discoveries and build new tools that few could have imagined only a few years ago. Traditionally, this kind of research has been limited by the availability of resources, with only the largest universities or industry partners able to successfully pursue these endeavors. However, the power of cloud computing has been removing obstacles that many researchers used to face, enabling projects that use machine learning tools to understand and address student questions and that study robotic interactions with humans, among many more.

In order to ensure that more researchers have access to powerful cloud tools, we’re launching Google Cloud Platform (GCP) research credits, a new program aimed to support faculty in qualified regions who want to take advantage of GCP’s compute, analytics, and machine-learning capabilities for research. Higher education researchers can use GCP research credits in a multitude of ways — below are just three examples to illustrate how GCP can help propel your research forward.

Andrew V. Sutherland, a computational number theorist and Principal Research Scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is one of a growing number of academic researchers who has already made the transition and benefited from GCP. His team moved his extremely large database to GCP because “we are mathematicians who want to focus on our research, and not have to worry about hardware failures or scaling issues with the website.”

Ryan Abernathey, Assistant Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Ocean and Climate Physics at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University, used Google Cloud credits through an NSF partnership and, with his team, developed an open-source platform to manage the complex data sets of climate science. The platform, called Pangeo, can run Earth System Modeling simulations on petabytes of high-resolution, three-dimensional data. “This is the future of what day-to-day science research computing will look like,” he predicts.

At the Stanford Center for Genomics and Personalized Medicine (SCGPM), researchers using GCP and BigQuery can now run hundreds of genomes through a variant analysis pipeline and get query results quickly. Mike Snyder, director of SCGPM, notes, “We’re entering an era where people are working with thousands or tens of thousands or even million genome projects, and you’re never going to do that on a local cluster very easily. Cloud computing is where the field is going.”

The GCP research credits program is open to faculty doing cutting-edge research in eligible countries. We’re eager to hear how we can help accelerate your progress. If you’re interested, you can learn more on our website or apply now.

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Announcing the Google Cloud Platform Research Credits Program

Posted by Steven Butschi, Head of Higher Education, Google

Scientists across nearly every discipline are researching ever larger and more complex data sets, using tremendous amounts of compute power to learn, make discoveries and build new tools that few could have imagined only a few years ago. Traditionally, this kind of research has been limited by the availability of resources, with only the largest universities or industry partners able to successfully pursue these endeavors. However, the power of cloud computing has been removing obstacles that many researchers used to face, enabling projects that use machine learning tools to understand and address student questions and that study robotic interactions with humans, among many more.

In order to ensure that more researchers have access to powerful cloud tools, we’re launching Google Cloud Platform (GCP) research credits, a new program aimed to support faculty in qualified regions who want to take advantage of GCP’s compute, analytics, and machine-learning capabilities for research. Higher education researchers can use GCP research credits in a multitude of ways — below are just three examples to illustrate how GCP can help propel your research forward.

Andrew V. Sutherland, a computational number theorist and Principal Research Scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is one of a growing number of academic researchers who has already made the transition and benefited from GCP. His team moved his extremely large database to GCP because “we are mathematicians who want to focus on our research, and not have to worry about hardware failures or scaling issues with the website.”

Ryan Abernathey, Assistant Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Ocean and Climate Physics at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University, used Google Cloud credits through an NSF partnership and, with his team, developed an open-source platform to manage the complex data sets of climate science. The platform, called Pangeo, can run Earth System Modeling simulations on petabytes of high-resolution, three-dimensional data. “This is the future of what day-to-day science research computing will look like,” he predicts.

At the Stanford Center for Genomics and Personalized Medicine (SCGPM), researchers using GCP and BigQuery can now run hundreds of genomes through a variant analysis pipeline and get query results quickly. Mike Snyder, director of SCGPM, notes, “We’re entering an era where people are working with thousands or tens of thousands or even million genome projects, and you’re never going to do that on a local cluster very easily. Cloud computing is where the field is going.”

The GCP research credits program is open to faculty doing cutting-edge research in eligible countries. We’re eager to hear how we can help accelerate your progress. If you’re interested, you can learn more on our website or apply now.

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Google’s Workshop on AI/ML Research and Practice in India

Posted by Pankaj Gupta and Anand Rangarajan, Engineering Directors, Google India

Last month, Google Bangalore hosted the Workshop on Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning, with the goal of fostering collaboration between the academic and industry research communities in India. This forum was designed to exchange current research and industry projects in AI & ML, and included faculty and researchers from Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs) and other leading universities in India, along with industry practitioners from Amazon, Delhivery, Flipkart, LinkedIn, Myntra, Microsoft, Ola and many more. Participants spoke on the ongoing research and work being undertaken in India in deep learning, computer vision, natural language processing, systems and generative models (you can access all the presentations from the workshop here).

Google’s Jeff Dean and Prabhakar Raghavan kicked off the workshop by sharing Google’s uses of deep learning to solve challenging problems and reinventing productivity using AI. Additional keynotes were delivered by Googlers Rajen Sheth and Roberto Bayardo. We also hosted a panel discussion on the challenges and future of AI/ML ecosystem in India, moderated by Google Bangalore’s Pankaj Gupta. Panel participants included Anirban Dasgupta (IIT Gandhinagar), Chiranjib Bhattacharyya of the Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Ashish Tendulkar and Srinivas Raaghav (Google India) and Shourya Roy (American Express Big Data Labs).

Prabhakar Raghavan’s keynote address

Sessions
The workshop agenda included five broad sessions with presentations by attendees in the following areas:

Pankaj Gupta moderating the panel discussion

Summary and Next Steps
As in many countries around the world, we are seeing increased dialog on various aspects of AI and ML in multiple contexts in India. This workshop hosted 80 attendees representing 9 universities and 36 companies contributing 28 excellent talks, with many opportunities for discussing challenges and opportunities for AI/ML in India. Google will continue to foster this exchange of ideas across a diverse set of folks and applications. As part of this, we also announced the upcoming research awards round (applications due June 4) to support up to seven faculty members in India on their AI/ML research, and new work on an accelerator program for Indian entrepreneurs focused primarily on AI/ML technologies. Please keep an eye out for more information about these programs.

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Google’s Workshop on AI/ML Research and Practice in India

Posted by Pankaj Gupta and Anand Rangarajan, Engineering Directors, Google India

Last month, Google Bangalore hosted the Workshop on Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning, with the goal of fostering collaboration between the academic and industry research communities in India. This forum was designed to exchange current research and industry projects in AI & ML, and included faculty and researchers from Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs) and other leading universities in India, along with industry practitioners from Amazon, Delhivery, Flipkart, LinkedIn, Myntra, Microsoft, Ola and many more. Participants spoke on the ongoing research and work being undertaken in India in deep learning, computer vision, natural language processing, systems and generative models (you can access all the presentations from the workshop here).

Google’s Jeff Dean and Prabhakar Raghavan kicked off the workshop by sharing Google’s uses of deep learning to solve challenging problems and reinventing productivity using AI. Additional keynotes were delivered by Googlers Rajen Sheth and Roberto Bayardo. We also hosted a panel discussion on the challenges and future of AI/ML ecosystem in India, moderated by Google Bangalore’s Pankaj Gupta. Panel participants included Anirban Dasgupta (IIT Gandhinagar), Chiranjib Bhattacharyya of the Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Ashish Tendulkar and Srinivas Raaghav (Google India) and Shourya Roy (American Express Big Data Labs).

Prabhakar Raghavan’s keynote address

Sessions
The workshop agenda included five broad sessions with presentations by attendees in the following areas:

Pankaj Gupta moderating the panel discussion

Summary and Next Steps
As in many countries around the world, we are seeing increased dialog on various aspects of AI and ML in multiple contexts in India. This workshop hosted 80 attendees representing 9 universities and 36 companies contributing 28 excellent talks, with many opportunities for discussing challenges and opportunities for AI/ML in India. Google will continue to foster this exchange of ideas across a diverse set of folks and applications. As part of this, we also announced the upcoming research awards round (applications due June 4) to support up to seven faculty members in India on their AI/ML research, and new work on an accelerator program for Indian entrepreneurs focused primarily on AI/ML technologies. Please keep an eye out for more information about these programs.

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Check out Mezco Toyz One:12 Collective 1/12th scale Blade 16cm tall action figure preview

Blade, vampire hunter of the Marvel Universe, joins the One:12 Collective.

The One:12 Collective Blade figure features two intricately detailed head portraits: an unwelcoming scowl and a bloodcurdling roar. No details were overlooked when designing the infamous daywalker. His outfit boasts a leather-like black trench coat with an integrated wire for dynamic posing, as well as a tailored three-quarter sleeve t-shirt and motorcycle style pants. Blade comes well-equipped to hunt down creatures of the night with accessories including a customized submachine gun with removable magazines, a pump action shotgun, his signature sword with removable sheath, collapsible throwing blades, striking stakes, and of course, sunglasses.

Eric Brooks was being born when a vampire attacked his mother during childbirth, passing on a series of enzymes that transformed Eric into a Dhampir – a being tainted by a vampire’s kiss, but not converted. Now infused with all of a vampire’s powers but few of their weaknesses and determined to avenge his mother’s death, Eric Brooks arms himself with weapons that are fatal to the undead and fashioned himself into the vampire hunter known as Blade.

Mezco Toyz One:12 Collective Blade figure features: Two (2) head portraits, Approximately 16 cm tall One:12 Collective body with over 30 points of articulation, Hand painted authentic detailing, Eight (8) interchangeable hands: pair of fists, pair of sword-holding hands, stake holding hand (L), gun holding hand (R), pair of posing hands

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Click on them for bigger and better views.

COSTUME: Tailored trench coat with integrated wire for dynamic posing (removable), Three-quarter sleeve t-shirt, Motorcycle pants, Belt (removable) with throwing blade sheath harness, Thigh harness for stakes, Work boots

ACCESSORIES: customized submachine gun with two (2) removable magazines, customized shotgun with pump action movement, sword with removable magnetic sheath, Two (2) folding throwing blades, Three (3) stakes, Two (2) pairs of removable sunglasses, blast gun effect, firing gun effect

Each One:12 Collective Blade figure is packaged in a collector friendly box, designed with collectors in mind.

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